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Elevated amygdala activity during reappraisal anticipation predicts anxiety in avoidant personality disorder
Bryan T. Denny; Jin Fan; Liu X(刘勋); Harold W. Koenigsberg; Kevin N. Ochsner; Stephanie Guerreri; Sarah Jo Mayson; Liza Rimsky; Antonia McMaster; Antonia S. New; Marianne Goodman; Larry J. Sievera
2015
Source PublicationJOURNAL OF AFFECTIVE DISORDERS
Correspondent Emailhwarrenk@nyc.rr.com
Volume172Issue:2Pages:1-7
Contribution Rank3
AbstractBackground
Avoidant personality disorder is characterized by pervasive anxiety, fear of criticism, disapproval, and rejection, particularly in anticipation of exposure to social situations. An important but underexplored question concerns whether anxiety in avoidant patients is associated with an impaired ability to engage emotion regulatory strategies in anticipation of and during appraisal of negative social stimuli.

Methods
We examined the use of an adaptive emotion regulation strategy, cognitive reappraisal, in avoidant patients. In addition to assessing individual differences in state and trait anxiety levels, self-reported affect as well as measures of neural activity were compared between 17 avoidant patients and 21 healthy control participants both in anticipation of and during performance of a reappraisal task.

Results
Avoidant patients showed greater state and trait-related anxiety relative to healthy participants. In addition, relative to healthy participants, avoidant patients showed pronounced amygdala hyper-reactivity during reappraisal anticipation, and this hyper-reactivity effect was positively associated with increasing self-reported anxiety levels.

Limitations
Our finding of exaggerated amygdala activity during reappraisal anticipation could reflect anxiety about the impending need to reappraise, anxiety about the certainty of an upcoming negative image, or anxiety relating to anticipated scrutiny of task responses by the experimenters. While we believe that all of these possibilities are consistent with the phenomenology of avoidant personality disorder, future research may clarify this ambiguity.

Conclusions
These results suggest that amygdala reactivity in anticipation of receiving negative social information may represent a key component of the neural mechanisms underlying the heightened anxiety present in avoidant patients.
KeywordAvoidant personality disorder Reappraisal Anticipation Anxiety FMRI Amygdala
DOI10.1016/j.jad.2014.09.017
URL查看原文
Indexed BySCI
Funding ProjectNational Institute of Mental Health (R01 MH077813 to Dr. Koenigsberg), by the James J Peters Veterans Affairs Medical Center, and Grant UL1TR000067 from the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences (NCATS), a component of the National Institutes of Health (NIH).
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Document Type期刊论文
Identifierhttp://ir.psych.ac.cn/handle/311026/10193
Collection认知与发展心理学研究室
Corresponding AuthorHarold W. Koenigsberg
Recommended Citation
GB/T 7714
Bryan T. Denny,Jin Fan,Liu X,et al. Elevated amygdala activity during reappraisal anticipation predicts anxiety in avoidant personality disorder[J]. JOURNAL OF AFFECTIVE DISORDERS,2015,172(2):1-7.
APA Bryan T. Denny.,Jin Fan.,Liu X.,Harold W. Koenigsberg.,Kevin N. Ochsner.,...&Larry J. Sievera.(2015).Elevated amygdala activity during reappraisal anticipation predicts anxiety in avoidant personality disorder.JOURNAL OF AFFECTIVE DISORDERS,172(2),1-7.
MLA Bryan T. Denny,et al."Elevated amygdala activity during reappraisal anticipation predicts anxiety in avoidant personality disorder".JOURNAL OF AFFECTIVE DISORDERS 172.2(2015):1-7.
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