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Functional Foveal Splitting: Evidence from Neuropsychological and Multimodal MRI Investigations in a Chinese Patient with a Splenium Lesion
Luo, Benyan1; Shan, Chunlei2; Zhu, Renjing3; Weng, Xuchu4,5; He, Sheng6; Luo, BY (reprint author), Zhejiang Univ, Sch Med, Affiliated Hosp 1, Dept Neurol, Hangzhou 310003, Zhejiang, Peoples R China.
2011-08-26
发表期刊PLOS ONE
ISSN1932-6203
文章类型Article
卷号6期号:8
产权排序4
摘要It remains controversial and hotly debated whether foveal information is double-projected to both hemispheres or split at the midline between the two hemispheres. We investigated this issue in a unique patient with lesions in the splenium of the corpus callosum and the left medial occipitotemporal region, through a series of neuropsychological tests and multimodal MRI scans. Behavioral experiments showed that (1) the patient had difficulties in reading simple and compound Chinese characters when they were presented in the foveal but left to the fixation, (2) he failed to recognize the left component of compound characters when the compound characters were presented in the central foveal field, (3) his judgments of the gender of centrally presented chimeric faces were exclusively based on the left half-face and he was unaware that the faces were chimeric. Functional MRI data showed that Chinese characters, only when presented in the right foveal field but not in the left foveal field, activated a region in the left occipitotemporal sulcus in the mid-fusiform, which is recognized as visual word form area. Together with existing evidence in the literature, results of the current study suggest that the representation of foveal stimuli is functionally split at object processing levels.
学科领域Medical Psychology,Cognitive Neuroscience
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收录类别SCI
语种英语
项目资助者National Natural Science Foundation [31070905] ; Chinese Ministry of Science and Technology [2007CB512300] ; NSF [BCS-0818588]
项目简介This work was supported by 1. National Natural Science Foundation, No. 31070905 (http://www.nsfc.gov.cn/Portal0/default106.htm); 2. Chinese Ministry of Science and Technology, No. 2007CB512300 (http://www.most.gov.cn/eng/); 3. NSF grant BCS-0818588(www.nsf.gov). The funders had no role in study design, data collection and analysis, decision to publish, or preparation of the manuscript.
WOS记录号WOS:000294298800024
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被引频次:5[WOS]   [WOS记录]     [WOS相关记录]
文献类型期刊论文
条目标识符http://ir.psych.ac.cn/handle/311026/12826
专题中国科学院心理健康重点实验室
通讯作者Luo, BY (reprint author), Zhejiang Univ, Sch Med, Affiliated Hosp 1, Dept Neurol, Hangzhou 310003, Zhejiang, Peoples R China.
作者单位1.Zhejiang Univ, Sch Med, Affiliated Hosp 1, Dept Neurol, Hangzhou 310003, Zhejiang, Peoples R China
2.Nanjing Med Univ, Dept Rehabil Med, Affiliated Hosp 1, Nanjing, Peoples R China
3.Xiamen Univ, Zhongshan Hosp, Dept Neurol, Xiamen, Peoples R China
4.Chinese Acad Sci, Inst Psychol, Key Lab Mental Hlth, Beijing 100101, Peoples R China
5.Hangzhou Normal Univ, Ctr Human Brain Res, Hangzhou, Zhejiang, Peoples R China
6.Univ Minnesota, Dept Psychol, Minneapolis, MN 55455 USA
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Luo, Benyan,Shan, Chunlei,Zhu, Renjing,et al. Functional Foveal Splitting: Evidence from Neuropsychological and Multimodal MRI Investigations in a Chinese Patient with a Splenium Lesion[J]. PLOS ONE,2011,6(8).
APA Luo, Benyan,Shan, Chunlei,Zhu, Renjing,Weng, Xuchu,He, Sheng,&Luo, BY .(2011).Functional Foveal Splitting: Evidence from Neuropsychological and Multimodal MRI Investigations in a Chinese Patient with a Splenium Lesion.PLOS ONE,6(8).
MLA Luo, Benyan,et al."Functional Foveal Splitting: Evidence from Neuropsychological and Multimodal MRI Investigations in a Chinese Patient with a Splenium Lesion".PLOS ONE 6.8(2011).
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