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Pedestrians' crossing behaviors and safety at unmarked roadway in China
Zhuang, Xiangling2,3; Wu, Changxu1,2; Wu, CX (reprint author), SUNY Buffalo, Dept Ind & Syst Engn, 414 Bell Hall, Buffalo, NY 10010 USA.
2011-11-01
Source PublicationACCIDENT ANALYSIS AND PREVENTION
ISSN0001-4575
SubtypeArticle
Volume43Issue:6Pages:1927-1936
Contribution Rank1
AbstractPedestrians' crossing out of crosswalks (unmarked roadway) contributed to many traffic accidents, but existing pedestrian studies mainly focus on crosswalk crossing in developed countries specifically. Field observation of 254 pedestrians at unmarked roadway in China showed that 65.7% of them did not look for vehicles after arriving at the curb. Those who did look and pay attention to the traffic did so for duration of time that followed an exponential distribution. Pedestrians preferred crossing actively in tentative ways rather than waiting passively. The waiting time at the curb, at the median, and at the roadway all followed exponential distributions. During crossing, all pedestrians looked at the oncoming vehicles. When interacting with these vehicles, 31.9% of them ran and 11.4% stepped backwards. Running pedestrians usually began running at the borderline rather than within the lanes. Pedestrians preferred safe to short paths and they crossed second half of the road with significantly higher speed. These behavioral patterns were rechecked at an additional site with 105 pedestrians and the results showed much accordance. In terms of safety, pedestrians who were middle aged, involved in bigger groups, looked at vehicles more often before crossing or interacted with buses rather than cars were safer while those running were more dangerous. Potential applications of these findings, including building accurate simulation models of pedestrians and education of drivers and pedestrians in developing countries were also discussed. (C) 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
KeywordPedestrian Unmarked roadway Crossing pattern Safety margin
Subject AreaEnvironmental Psychology
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Indexed BySSCI
Language英语
WOS IDWOS:000294530000005
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Document Type期刊论文
Identifierhttp://ir.psych.ac.cn/handle/311026/12888
Collection社会与工程心理学研究室
Corresponding AuthorWu, CX (reprint author), SUNY Buffalo, Dept Ind & Syst Engn, 414 Bell Hall, Buffalo, NY 10010 USA.
Affiliation1.SUNY Buffalo, Dept Ind & Syst Engn, Buffalo, NY 10010 USA
2.Chinese Acad Sci, Inst Psychol, Beijing 100864, Peoples R China
3.Chinese Acad Sci, Grad Univ, Beijing 100864, Peoples R China
Recommended Citation
GB/T 7714
Zhuang, Xiangling,Wu, Changxu,Wu, CX . Pedestrians' crossing behaviors and safety at unmarked roadway in China[J]. ACCIDENT ANALYSIS AND PREVENTION,2011,43(6):1927-1936.
APA Zhuang, Xiangling,Wu, Changxu,&Wu, CX .(2011).Pedestrians' crossing behaviors and safety at unmarked roadway in China.ACCIDENT ANALYSIS AND PREVENTION,43(6),1927-1936.
MLA Zhuang, Xiangling,et al."Pedestrians' crossing behaviors and safety at unmarked roadway in China".ACCIDENT ANALYSIS AND PREVENTION 43.6(2011):1927-1936.
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