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Tactical Self-Enhancement in China: Is Modesty at the Service of Self-Enhancement in East Asian Culture?
Cai, Huajian1; Sedikides, Constantine2; Gaertner, Lowell3; Wang, Chenjun4; Carvallo, Mauricio5; Xu, Yiyuan6; O'Mara, Erin M.3; Jackson, Lydia Eckstein3; Cai, HJ (reprint author), Chinese Acad Sci, Inst Psychol, 4A Datun Rd, Beijing 100101, Peoples R China.
2011
Source PublicationSOCIAL PSYCHOLOGICAL AND PERSONALITY SCIENCE
ISSN1948-5506
SubtypeArticle
Volume2Issue:1Pages:59-64
Contribution Rank1
AbstractIs self-enhancement culturally universal or relativistic? This article highlights a nuanced dynamic in East Asian culture. Modesty is a prevailing norm in China. The authors hypothesized that because of socialization practices and prohibitive cultural pressures, modesty would be associated with and lead to low explicit self-enhancement but high implicit self-enhancement, that Chinese participants would deemphasize explicitly the positivity of the self when high on modesty or situationally prompted to behave modestly but would capitalize on their modest disposition or situationally induced behavior to emphasize implicitly the positivity of the self. In support of the hypotheses, dispositionally or situationally modest Chinese participants manifested low explicit self-esteem while manifesting high implicit self-esteem. Modesty among American participants constrained explicit self-esteem but yielded no associations with implicit self-esteem. The results showcase the tactical nature of self-enhancement in Chinese culture and call for research on when and how self-enhancement is pursued tactically in different cultures.
Keywordself-enhancement modesty implicit self-esteem explicit self-esteem tactical self-enhancement
Subject AreaCultural Psychology
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Indexed BySSCI
Language英语
Funding OrganizationIs self-enhancement culturally universal or relativistic? This article highlights a nuanced dynamic in East Asian culture. Modesty is a prevailing norm in China. The authors hypothesized that because of socialization practices and prohibitive cultural pressures, modesty would be associated with and lead to low explicit self-enhancement but high implicit self-enhancement, that Chinese participants would deemphasize explicitly the positivity of the self when high on modesty or situationally prompted to behave modestly but would capitalize on their modest disposition or situationally induced behavior to emphasize implicitly the positivity of the self. In support of the hypotheses, dispositionally or situationally modest Chinese participants manifested low explicit self-esteem while manifesting high implicit self-esteem. Modesty among American participants constrained explicit self-esteem but yielded no associations with implicit self-esteem. The results showcase the tactical nature of self-enhancement in Chinese culture and call for research on when and how self-enhancement is pursued tactically in different cultures.
Project Intro.Is self-enhancement culturally universal or relativistic? This article highlights a nuanced dynamic in East Asian culture. Modesty is a prevailing norm in China. The authors hypothesized that because of socialization practices and prohibitive cultural pressures, modesty would be associated with and lead to low explicit self-enhancement but high implicit self-enhancement, that Chinese participants would deemphasize explicitly the positivity of the self when high on modesty or situationally prompted to behave modestly but would capitalize on their modest disposition or situationally induced behavior to emphasize implicitly the positivity of the self. In support of the hypotheses, dispositionally or situationally modest Chinese participants manifested low explicit self-esteem while manifesting high implicit self-esteem. Modesty among American participants constrained explicit self-esteem but yielded no associations with implicit self-esteem. The results showcase the tactical nature of self-enhancement in Chinese culture and call for research on when and how self-enhancement is pursued tactically in different cultures.
WOS IDWOS:000208992000009
Citation statistics
Cited Times:59[WOS]   [WOS Record]     [Related Records in WOS]
Document Type期刊论文
Identifierhttp://ir.psych.ac.cn/handle/311026/13276
Collection社会与工程心理学研究室
Corresponding AuthorCai, HJ (reprint author), Chinese Acad Sci, Inst Psychol, 4A Datun Rd, Beijing 100101, Peoples R China.
Affiliation1.Chinese Acad Sci, Inst Psychol, Beijing 100101, Peoples R China
2.Univ Southampton, Ctr Res Self & Ident, Southampton, Hants, England
3.Univ Tennessee, Knoxville, TN USA
4.Sun Yat Sen Univ, Guangzhou 510275, Guangdong, Peoples R China
5.Univ Oklahoma, Dept Psychol, Norman, OK 73019 USA
6.Univ Hawaii Manoa, Dept Psychol, Manoa, HI USA
Recommended Citation
GB/T 7714
Cai, Huajian,Sedikides, Constantine,Gaertner, Lowell,et al. Tactical Self-Enhancement in China: Is Modesty at the Service of Self-Enhancement in East Asian Culture?[J]. SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGICAL AND PERSONALITY SCIENCE,2011,2(1):59-64.
APA Cai, Huajian.,Sedikides, Constantine.,Gaertner, Lowell.,Wang, Chenjun.,Carvallo, Mauricio.,...&Cai, HJ .(2011).Tactical Self-Enhancement in China: Is Modesty at the Service of Self-Enhancement in East Asian Culture?.SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGICAL AND PERSONALITY SCIENCE,2(1),59-64.
MLA Cai, Huajian,et al."Tactical Self-Enhancement in China: Is Modesty at the Service of Self-Enhancement in East Asian Culture?".SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGICAL AND PERSONALITY SCIENCE 2.1(2011):59-64.
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