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Language Differences in the Brain Network for Reading in Naturalistic Story Reading and Lexical Decision
Wang, Xiaojuan1; Yang, Jianfeng1,4; Yang, Jie5; Mencl, W. Einar6; Shu, Hua2,3; Zevin, Jason David4,6,7,8
2015-05-27
Source PublicationPLOS ONE
ISSN1932-6203
SubtypeArticle
Volume10Issue:5Pages:1-25
AbstractDifferences in how writing systems represent language raise important questions about whether there could be a universal functional architecture for reading across languages. In order to study potential language differences in the neural networks that support reading skill, we collected fMRI data from readers of alphabetic (English) and morpho-syllabic (Chinese) writing systems during two reading tasks. In one, participants read short stories under conditions that approximate natural reading, and in the other, participants decided whether individual stimuli were real words or not. Prior work comparing these two writing systems has overwhelmingly used meta-linguistic tasks, generally supporting the conclusion that the reading system is organized differently for skilled readers of Chinese and English. We observed that language differences in the reading network were greatly dependent on task. In lexical decision, a pattern consistent with prior research was observed in which the Middle Frontal Gyrus (MFG) and right Fusiform Gyrus (rFFG) were more active for Chinese than for English, whereas the posterior temporal sulcus was more active for English than for Chinese. We found a very different pattern of language effects in a naturalistic reading paradigm, during which significant differences were only observed in visual regions not typically considered specific to the reading network, and the middle temporal gyrus, which is thought to be important for direct mapping of orthography to semantics. Indeed, in areas that are often discussed as supporting distinct cognitive or linguistic functions between the two languages, we observed interaction. Specifically, language differences were most pronounced in MFG and rFFG during the lexical decision task, whereas no language differences were observed in these areas during silent reading of text for comprehension.
Indexed BySCI
Language英语
WOS IDWOS:000355185600004
Citation statistics
Document Type期刊论文
Identifierhttp://ir.psych.ac.cn/handle/311026/13378
Collection认知与发展心理学研究室
Affiliation1.Shaanxi Normal Univ, Sch Psychol, Key Lab Behav & Cognit Neurosci Shaanxi Prov, Xian, Peoples R China
2.Beijing Normal Univ, State Key Lab Cognit Neurosci & Learning, Beijing 100875, Peoples R China
3.Beijing Normal Univ, IDG McGovern Inst Brain Res, Beijing 100875, Peoples R China
4.Chinese Acad Sci, Inst Psychol, Beijing 100101, Peoples R China
5.Univ Calif Irvine, Dept Neurol, Irvine, CA 92717 USA
6.Yale Univ, Haskins Labs, New Haven, CT USA
7.Univ So Calif, Dept Psychol, Los Angeles, CA 90089 USA
8.Univ So Calif, Dept Linguist, Los Angeles, CA 90089 USA
Recommended Citation
GB/T 7714
Wang, Xiaojuan,Yang, Jianfeng,Yang, Jie,et al. Language Differences in the Brain Network for Reading in Naturalistic Story Reading and Lexical Decision[J]. PLOS ONE,2015,10(5):1-25.
APA Wang, Xiaojuan,Yang, Jianfeng,Yang, Jie,Mencl, W. Einar,Shu, Hua,&Zevin, Jason David.(2015).Language Differences in the Brain Network for Reading in Naturalistic Story Reading and Lexical Decision.PLOS ONE,10(5),1-25.
MLA Wang, Xiaojuan,et al."Language Differences in the Brain Network for Reading in Naturalistic Story Reading and Lexical Decision".PLOS ONE 10.5(2015):1-25.
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