PSYCH OpenIR  > 中国科学院心理健康重点实验室
Similar frequency of the McGurk effect in large samples of native Mandarin Chinese and American English speakers
Magnotti, John F.1; Mallick, Debshila Basu2; Feng, Guo3; Zhou, Bin3; Zhou, Wen3; Beauchamp, Michael S.1
2015-09-01
Source PublicationEXPERIMENTAL BRAIN RESEARCH
ISSN0014-4819
SubtypeArticle
Volume233Issue:9Pages:2581-2586
AbstractHumans combine visual information from mouth movements with auditory information from the voice to recognize speech. A common method for assessing multisensory speech perception is the McGurk effect: When presented with particular pairings of incongruent auditory and visual speech syllables (e.g., the auditory speech sounds for "ba" dubbed onto the visual mouth movements for "ga"), individuals perceive a third syllable, distinct from the auditory and visual components. Chinese and American cultures differ in the prevalence of direct facial gaze and in the auditory structure of their languages, raising the possibility of cultural- and language-related group differences in the McGurk effect. There is no consensus in the literature about the existence of these group differences, with some studies reporting less McGurk effect in native Mandarin Chinese speakers than in English speakers and others reporting no difference. However, these studies sampled small numbers of participants tested with a small number of stimuli. Therefore, we collected data on the McGurk effect from large samples of Mandarin-speaking individuals from China and English-speaking individuals from the USA (total n = 307) viewing nine different stimuli. Averaged across participants and stimuli, we found similar frequencies of the McGurk effect between Chinese and American participants (48 vs. 44 %). In both groups, we observed a large range of frequencies both across participants (range from 0 to 100 %) and stimuli (15 to 83 %) with the main effect of culture and language accounting for only 0.3 % of the variance in the data. High individual variability in perception of the McGurk effect necessitates the use of large sample sizes to accurately estimate group differences.
KeywordMcGurk effect Cultural differences Audiovisual speech Multisensory integration
Indexed BySCI
Language英语
WOS IDWOS:000359649500009
Citation statistics
Document Type期刊论文
Identifierhttp://ir.psych.ac.cn/handle/311026/13664
Collection中国科学院心理健康重点实验室
Affiliation1.Baylor Coll Med, Dept Neurosurg, Houston, TX 77030 USA
2.Rice Univ, Dept Psychol, Houston, TX 77251 USA
3.Chinese Acad Sci, Inst Psychol, Key Lab Mental Hlth, Beijing 100101, Peoples R China
Recommended Citation
GB/T 7714
Magnotti, John F.,Mallick, Debshila Basu,Feng, Guo,et al. Similar frequency of the McGurk effect in large samples of native Mandarin Chinese and American English speakers[J]. EXPERIMENTAL BRAIN RESEARCH,2015,233(9):2581-2586.
APA Magnotti, John F.,Mallick, Debshila Basu,Feng, Guo,Zhou, Bin,Zhou, Wen,&Beauchamp, Michael S..(2015).Similar frequency of the McGurk effect in large samples of native Mandarin Chinese and American English speakers.EXPERIMENTAL BRAIN RESEARCH,233(9),2581-2586.
MLA Magnotti, John F.,et al."Similar frequency of the McGurk effect in large samples of native Mandarin Chinese and American English speakers".EXPERIMENTAL BRAIN RESEARCH 233.9(2015):2581-2586.
Files in This Item:
File Name/Size DocType Version Access License
WOS_000359649500009.(516KB)期刊论文出版稿暂不开放CC BY-NC-SAApplication Full Text
Related Services
Recommend this item
Bookmark
Usage statistics
Export to Endnote
Google Scholar
Similar articles in Google Scholar
[Magnotti, John F.]'s Articles
[Mallick, Debshila Basu]'s Articles
[Feng, Guo]'s Articles
Baidu academic
Similar articles in Baidu academic
[Magnotti, John F.]'s Articles
[Mallick, Debshila Basu]'s Articles
[Feng, Guo]'s Articles
Bing Scholar
Similar articles in Bing Scholar
[Magnotti, John F.]'s Articles
[Mallick, Debshila Basu]'s Articles
[Feng, Guo]'s Articles
Terms of Use
No data!
Social Bookmark/Share
All comments (0)
No comment.
 

Items in the repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.