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Common and segregated neural substrates for automatic conceptual and affective priming as revealed by event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging
Liu, Hongyan1; Hu, Zhiguo2; Peng, Danling1; Yang, Yanhui3; Li, Kuncheng3
2010-02-01
Source PublicationBRAIN AND LANGUAGE
ISSN0093-934X
SubtypeArticle
Volume112Issue:2Pages:121-128
AbstractThe brain activity associated with automatic semantic priming has been extensively studied. Thus far there has been no prior study that directly contrasts the neural mechanisms of semantic and affective priming. The present study employed event-related fMRI to examine the common and distinct neural bases underlying conceptual and affective priming with a lexical decision task. A special type of emotional word. a dual-meaning word containing both conceptual meaning and affective meaning, was adopted as target. Short stimulus onset asynchrony (SOA) (50 ms) was used to emphasize automatic processing. Fifteen participants were scanned in the present study. We found that the left middle/superior temporal gyrus was the brain region involved in both automatic conceptual and affective priming effects, suggesting general lexical-semantic processing that share in the two types of priming. The left inferior frontal gyrus and right superior temporal gyrus were found to be the conceptual-specific areas in automatic priming effect, consistent with the role of these areas in more extensive within-category semantic processes. The results also revealed that the left fusiform gyrus and left insula were the affective-specific regions in automatic priming effect, demonstrating the involvement of the left fusiform gyrus in automatic affective priming effect, and clarifying the role of the insula in emotional processing rather than conceptual processing. Despite comparable behavioral effects of automatic conceptual priming and affective priming, the present study revealed a neural dissociation of the two types of priming, as well as the shared neural bases.
KeywordConceptual priming Affective priming Lexical decision Automatic processing fMRI
Indexed BySCI
Language英语
WOS IDWOS:000275348000004
Citation statistics
Cited Times:17[WOS]   [WOS Record]     [Related Records in WOS]
Document Type期刊论文
Identifierhttp://ir.psych.ac.cn/handle/311026/13765
Collection中国科学院心理研究所回溯数据库(1956-2010)
Affiliation1.Beijing Normal Univ, State Key Lab Cognit Neurosci & Learning, Beijing 100875, Peoples R China
2.Chinese Acad Sci, Inst Psychol, Lab Higher Brain Funct, Beijing 100101, Peoples R China
3.Xuanwu Hosp, Beijing, Peoples R China
Recommended Citation
GB/T 7714
Liu, Hongyan,Hu, Zhiguo,Peng, Danling,et al. Common and segregated neural substrates for automatic conceptual and affective priming as revealed by event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging[J]. BRAIN AND LANGUAGE,2010,112(2):121-128.
APA Liu, Hongyan,Hu, Zhiguo,Peng, Danling,Yang, Yanhui,&Li, Kuncheng.(2010).Common and segregated neural substrates for automatic conceptual and affective priming as revealed by event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging.BRAIN AND LANGUAGE,112(2),121-128.
MLA Liu, Hongyan,et al."Common and segregated neural substrates for automatic conceptual and affective priming as revealed by event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging".BRAIN AND LANGUAGE 112.2(2010):121-128.
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