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N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor-mediated glutamate transmission in nucleus accumbens plays a more important role than that in dorsal striatum in cognitive flexibility
Ding, Xuekun1,2; Qiao, Yanhua1,2; Piao, Chengji1,2; Zheng, Xigeng1; Liu, Zhengkui1; Liang, Jing1
First AuthorDing, Xuekun
Correspondent Emailliangj@psych.ac.cn
Contribution Rank1
Abstract

Cognitive flexibility is a critical ability for adapting to an ever-changing environment in humans and animals. Deficits in cognitive flexibility are observed in most schizophrenia patients. Previous studies reported that the medial prefrontal cortex-to-ventral striatum and orbital frontal cortex-to-dorsal striatum circuits play important roles in extra- and intra-dimensional strategy switching, respectively. However, the precise function of striatal subregions in flexible behaviors is still unclear. N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) are major glutamate receptors in the striatum that receive glutamatergic projections from the frontal cortex. The membrane insertion of Ca2+-permeable alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole-propionic acid receptors (AMPARs) depends on NMDAR activation and is required in learning and memory processes. In the present study, we measured set shifting and reversal learning performance in operant chambers in rats and assessed the effects of blocking NMDARs and Ca2+-permeable AMPARs in striatal subregions on behavioral flexibility. The blockade of NMDARs in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) core by AP5 impaired set-shifting ability by causing a failure to modify prior learning. The suppression of NMDAR-mediated transmission in the NAc shell induced a deficit in set shifting by disrupting the learning and maintenance of novel strategies. During reversal learning, infusions of AP5 into the NAc shell and core impaired the ability to learn and maintain new strategies. However, behavioral flexibility was not significantly affected by blocking NMDARs in the dorsal striatum. We also found that the blockade of Ca2+-permeable AMPARs by NASPM in any subregion of the striatum did not affect strategy switching. These findings suggest that NMDAR-mediated glutamate transmission in the NAc contributes more to cognitive execution compared with the dorsal striatum.

KeywordNmda Receptor Ampa Receptor Striatum Set-shifting Reversal Learning
2014-09-05
Language英语
Source PublicationFRONTIERS IN BEHAVIORAL NEUROSCIENCE
ISSN1662-5153
Volume8Issue:0Pages:304
SubtypeArticle
Indexed BySCI
WOS IDWOS:000341690000001
QuartileQ1
Citation statistics
Cited Times:15[WOS]   [WOS Record]     [Related Records in WOS]
Document Type期刊论文
Identifierhttp://ir.psych.ac.cn/handle/311026/14161
Collection中国科学院心理健康重点实验室
Corresponding AuthorLiang, Jing
Affiliation1.Chinese Acad Sci, Inst Psychol, Key Lab Mental Hlth, Beijing 100101, Peoples R China
2.Univ Chinese Acad Sci, Beijing, Peoples R China
First Author AffilicationKey Laboratory of Mental Health, CAS
Corresponding Author AffilicationKey Laboratory of Mental Health, CAS
Recommended Citation
GB/T 7714
Ding, Xuekun,Qiao, Yanhua,Piao, Chengji,et al. N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor-mediated glutamate transmission in nucleus accumbens plays a more important role than that in dorsal striatum in cognitive flexibility[J]. FRONTIERS IN BEHAVIORAL NEUROSCIENCE,2014,8(0):304.
APA Ding, Xuekun,Qiao, Yanhua,Piao, Chengji,Zheng, Xigeng,Liu, Zhengkui,&Liang, Jing.(2014).N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor-mediated glutamate transmission in nucleus accumbens plays a more important role than that in dorsal striatum in cognitive flexibility.FRONTIERS IN BEHAVIORAL NEUROSCIENCE,8(0),304.
MLA Ding, Xuekun,et al."N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor-mediated glutamate transmission in nucleus accumbens plays a more important role than that in dorsal striatum in cognitive flexibility".FRONTIERS IN BEHAVIORAL NEUROSCIENCE 8.0(2014):304.
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