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Neurobiological mechanisms of TENS-induced analgesia
Peng, W. W.1; Tang, Z. Y.2,3; Zhang, F. R.4; Li, H.1; Kong, Y. Z.2,3; Iannetti, G. D.5,6; Hu, L.2,3,6,7
First AuthorW.W. Peng
2019-07-15
Source PublicationNEUROIMAGE
Correspondent Emaill. hu(huli@psych.ac.cn)
ISSN1053-8119
Subtypearticle
Volume195Pages:396-408
Contribution Rank2
Abstract

Pain inhibition by additional somatosensory input is the rationale for the widespread use of Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation (TENS) to relieve pain. Two main types of TENS produce analgesia in animal models: high-frequency (similar to 50-100 Hz) and low-intensity 'conventional' TENS, and low-frequency (similar to 2-4 Hz) and high-intensity 'acupuncture-like' TENS. However, TENS efficacy in human participants is debated, raising the question of whether the analgesic mechanisms identified in animal models are valid in humans. Here, we used a sham-controlled experimental design to clarify the efficacy and the neurobiological effects of 'conventional' and 'acupuncture-like' TENS in 80 human volunteers. To test the analgesic effect of TENS we recorded the perceptual and brain responses elicited by radiant heat laser pulses that activate selectively A delta and C cutaneous nociceptors. To test whether TENS has a long-lasting effect on brain state we recorded spontaneous electrocortical oscillations. The analgesic effect of 'conventional' TENS was maximal when nociceptive stimuli were delivered homotopically, to the same hand that received the TENS. In contrast, 'acupuncture-like' TENS produced a spatially-diffuse analgesic effect, coupled with long-lasting changes both in the state of the primary sensorimotor cortex (S1/M1) and in the functional connectivity between S1/M1 and the medial prefrontal cortex, a core region in the descending pain inhibitory system. These results demonstrate that 'conventional' and 'acupuncture-like' TENS have different analgesic effects, which are mediated by different neurobiological mechanisms.

KeywordTranscutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) Pain Analgesia Electroencephalography (EEG) Resting state Human
DOI10.1016/j.neuroimage.2019.03.077
Indexed BySCI
Language英语
Funding OrganizationNational Natural Science Foundation of China ; Shenzhen Basic Research Project ; 13th Five-year Informatization Plan of Chinese Academy of Sciences ; Scientific Foundation project of Institute of Psychology, Chinese Academy of Sciences ; Wellcome Trust (PAIN JLARAXR) ; European Research Council (PAINSTRAT)
Funding ProjectNational Natural Science Foundation of China[31871127] ; National Natural Science Foundation of China[31671141] ; National Natural Science Foundation of China[31822025] ; Shenzhen Basic Research Project[JCYJ20170818093231953] ; 13th Five-year Informatization Plan of Chinese Academy of Sciences[XXH13506] ; Scientific Foundation project of Institute of Psychology, Chinese Academy of Sciences[Y6CX021008] ; Wellcome Trust (PAIN JLARAXR) ; European Research Council (PAINSTRAT)
WOS Research AreaNeurosciences & Neurology ; Radiology, Nuclear Medicine & Medical Imaging
WOS SubjectNeurosciences ; Neuroimaging ; Radiology, Nuclear Medicine & Medical Imaging
WOS IDWOS:000468743000035
PublisherACADEMIC PRESS INC ELSEVIER SCIENCE
WOS KeywordELECTRICAL NERVE-STIMULATION ; CORTICAL FUNCTIONAL CONNECTIVITY ; DIRECTED TRANSFER-FUNCTION ; HIGH-FREQUENCY ; INDUCED ANTIHYPERALGESIA ; INHIBITORY CONTROLS ; EXPERIMENTAL PAIN ; BRAIN POTENTIALS ; OPIOID RECEPTORS ; CAUSAL RELATIONS
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Document Type期刊论文
Identifierhttp://ir.psych.ac.cn/handle/311026/29257
Collection中国科学院心理健康重点实验室
Corresponding AuthorHu, L.
Affiliation1.Shenzhen Univ, Coll Psychol & Sociol, Shenzhen, Peoples R China
2.Chinese Acad Sci, Inst Psychol, Key Lab Mental Hlth, Beijing 100101, Peoples R China
3.Univ Chinese Acad Sci, Dept Psychol, Beijing, Peoples R China
4.Liaoning Normal Univ, Res Ctr Brain Cognit Neurosci, Dalian, Peoples R China
5.Ist Italiano Tecnol, Neurosci & Behav Lab, Rome, Italy
6.UCL, Dept Neurosci Physiol & Pharmacol, London, England
7.Guangzhou Med Univ, Affiliated Hosp 2, State Key Clin Specialty Pain Med, Dept Pain Management, Guangzhou, Guangdong, Peoples R China
Corresponding Author AffilicationKey Laboratory of Mental Health, CAS
Recommended Citation
GB/T 7714
Peng, W. W.,Tang, Z. Y.,Zhang, F. R.,et al. Neurobiological mechanisms of TENS-induced analgesia[J]. NEUROIMAGE,2019,195:396-408.
APA Peng, W. W..,Tang, Z. Y..,Zhang, F. R..,Li, H..,Kong, Y. Z..,...&Hu, L..(2019).Neurobiological mechanisms of TENS-induced analgesia.NEUROIMAGE,195,396-408.
MLA Peng, W. W.,et al."Neurobiological mechanisms of TENS-induced analgesia".NEUROIMAGE 195(2019):396-408.
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