PSYCH OpenIR
Future thinking is related to lower delay discounting than recent thinking, regardless of the magnitude of the reward, in individuals with schizotypy
Lu‐Xia Jia; Zhe Liu; Ji‐Fang Cui; Qing‐Yu Ding; Jun‐Yan Ye; Lu‐Lu Liu; Hua Xu; Ya Wang
First AuthorLu‐Xia Jia
Corresponding AuthorXu, Hua(sfpsyhuax@buu.edu.cn) ; Wang, Ya(wangyazsu@gmail.com)
Correspondent Emailwangya@psych.ac.cn
2020-03
Source PublicationAustralian Psychologist
ISSN0005-0067
Subtypearticle
Pages1-10
QuartileQ2
Contribution Rank1
Abstract

People often prefer immediate small rewards compared to delayed larger rewards, which is referred to delay discounting. Schizotypy, a subclinical group at risk for schizophrenia, tends to discount more than healthy controls. Episodic future thinking (EFT), in which people mentally simulate future events to pre‐experience the future, has been found to reduce delay discounting in the general population, but whether this effect can be found in individuals with schizotypy remains unknown. The present study examined, in individuals with schizotypy, whether EFT was associated with lower delay discounting compared to episodic recent thinking (ERT), and whether this effect was related to the magnitude of reward.

Method

A total of 63 individuals with schizotypy were randomly assigned to the EFT condition (n = 30) or the ERT condition (n = 33). A delay discounting task with both large and small reward conditions was used, and before making choices, participants were asked to vividly think about a future event (EFT condition) or a recent past event (ERT condition).

Results

Results showed that participants in the EFT condition showed lower delay discounting rate than participants in the ERT condition, regardless of the magnitude of reward. These findings suggest that EFT enhanced the ability to resist immediate reward and had an effect on impulsive decision‐making in schizotypy.

Conclusions

These results provided crucial insights for developing effective intervention for schizophrenia.

Keyworddelay discounting episodic future thinking episodic recent thinking impulsive decision-making schizotypy time perception
DOI10.1111/ap.12460
Indexed BySSCI ; SSCI
Language英语
Funding OrganizationNational Natural Science Foundation of China
Funding ProjectNational Natural Science Foundation of China[31571130]
WOS Research AreaPsychology
WOS SubjectPsychology, Multidisciplinary
WOS IDWOS:000563564900001
PublisherWILEY
WOS KeywordDECISION-MAKING ; INTERTEMPORAL CHOICE ; TIME-PERCEPTION ; PERSONALITY ; SCHIZOPHRENIA ; IMPULSIVITY ; MEMORY ; PROSPECTION ; PERFORMANCE ; DEFICITS
Citation statistics
Document Type期刊论文
Identifierhttp://ir.psych.ac.cn/handle/311026/31911
Collection中国科学院心理研究所
Corresponding AuthorHua Xu; Ya Wang
Affiliation1.Neuropsychology and Applied Cognitive Neuroscience Lab, CAS Key Laboratory of Mental Health, Institute of Psychology, Beijing, China
2.Department of Psychology, University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China
Recommended Citation
GB/T 7714
Lu‐Xia Jia,Zhe Liu,Ji‐Fang Cui,et al. Future thinking is related to lower delay discounting than recent thinking, regardless of the magnitude of the reward, in individuals with schizotypy[J]. Australian Psychologist,2020:1-10.
APA Lu‐Xia Jia.,Zhe Liu.,Ji‐Fang Cui.,Qing‐Yu Ding.,Jun‐Yan Ye.,...&Ya Wang.(2020).Future thinking is related to lower delay discounting than recent thinking, regardless of the magnitude of the reward, in individuals with schizotypy.Australian Psychologist,1-10.
MLA Lu‐Xia Jia,et al."Future thinking is related to lower delay discounting than recent thinking, regardless of the magnitude of the reward, in individuals with schizotypy".Australian Psychologist (2020):1-10.
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