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Increase of Collectivistic Expression in China During the COVID-19 Outbreak: An Empirical Study on Online Social Networks
Han, Nuo1,2; Ren, Xiaopeng1,2; Wu, Peijing1,2; Liu, Xiaoqian1; Zhu, Tingshao1,2
First AuthorHan, Nuo
Correspondent Emailrenxp@psych.ac.cn (xiaopeng ren ) ; tszhu@psych.ac.cn(zhu, tingshao)
Contribution Rank1
Abstract

The pathogen-prevalence hypothesis postulates that collectivism would be strengthened in the long term in tandem with recurrent attacks of infectious diseases. However, it is unclear whether a one-time pathogen epidemic would elevate collectivism. The outbreak of COVID-19 and the widespread prevalence of online social networks have provided researchers an opportunity to explore this issue. This study sampled and analyzed the posts of 126,165 active users on Weibo, a leading Chinese online social network. It used independent-sample t-tests to examine whether COVID-19 had an impact on Chinese collectivistic value-related behaviors by comparing the usage frequency of personal pronouns, group-related words, and relationship-related words before and after the outbreak. Overall, most collectivist words exhibited a significant upward trend after the outbreak. In turn, this tendency pointed to a rising sense of collectivism (versus individualism). Hence, this study confirmed the pathogen-prevalence hypothesis in real settings, finding that an outbreak of an infectious disease such as COVID-19 could exert an impact on collectivism and may deliver a theoretical basis for psychological protection against the threat of COVID-19. However, further evaluation is required to ascertain whether this trend is universal or culture-specific.

Keywordcollectivism pathogen-prevalence hypothesis online social networks big data COVID-19
2021-04-20
Language英语
DOI10.3389/fpsyg.2021.632204
Source PublicationFRONTIERS IN PSYCHOLOGY
ISSN1664-1078
Volume12Pages:9
Subtype实证研究
Indexed BySCI
Funding ProjectNational Social Science Fund of China[20BSH142] ; National Natural Science Foundation of China[31700984]
PublisherFRONTIERS MEDIA SA
WOS KeywordPATHOGEN PREVALENCE ; INDIVIDUALISM-COLLECTIVISM ; ASSORTATIVE SOCIALITY ; CULTURE ; PERSONALITY ; FACEBOOK ; DISEASE ; EXTROVERSION ; VARIABILITY ; MANAGEMENT
WOS Research AreaPsychology
WOS SubjectPsychology, Multidisciplinary
WOS IDWOS:000646375300001
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Document Type期刊论文
Identifierhttp://ir.psych.ac.cn/handle/311026/39387
Collection中国科学院行为科学重点实验室
Corresponding AuthorRen, Xiaopeng; Zhu, Tingshao
Affiliation1.Chinese Acad Sci, Inst Psychol, CAS Key Lab Behav Sci, Beijing, Peoples R China
2.Univ Chinese Acad Sci, Dept Psychol, Beijing, Peoples R China
First Author AffilicationKey Laboratory of Behavioral Science, CAS
Corresponding Author AffilicationKey Laboratory of Behavioral Science, CAS
Recommended Citation
GB/T 7714
Han, Nuo,Ren, Xiaopeng,Wu, Peijing,et al. Increase of Collectivistic Expression in China During the COVID-19 Outbreak: An Empirical Study on Online Social Networks[J]. FRONTIERS IN PSYCHOLOGY,2021,12:9.
APA Han, Nuo,Ren, Xiaopeng,Wu, Peijing,Liu, Xiaoqian,&Zhu, Tingshao.(2021).Increase of Collectivistic Expression in China During the COVID-19 Outbreak: An Empirical Study on Online Social Networks.FRONTIERS IN PSYCHOLOGY,12,9.
MLA Han, Nuo,et al."Increase of Collectivistic Expression in China During the COVID-19 Outbreak: An Empirical Study on Online Social Networks".FRONTIERS IN PSYCHOLOGY 12(2021):9.
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