PSYCH OpenIR  > 中国科学院行为科学重点实验室
Brain structural alterations in MDD patients with gastrointestinal symptoms: Evidence from the REST-meta-MDD project.
Liu, Peng-Hong; Li, Yan; Zhang, Ai-Xia; Sun, Ning; Li, Gai-Zhi; Chen, Xiao; Bai, Tong-Jian; Bo, Qi-Jing; Chen, Guan-Mao; Chen, Ning-Xuan; Chen, Tao-Lin; Chen, Wei; Cheng, Chang; Cheng, Yu-Qi; Cui, Xi-Long; Duan, Jia; Fang, Yi-Ru; Gong, Qi-Yong; Guo, Wen-Bin; Hou, Zheng-Hua; Hu, Lan; Kuang, Li; Li, Feng; Li, Kai-Ming; Li, Tao; Liu, Yan-Song; Liu, Zhe-Ning; Long, Yi-Cheng; Luo, Qing-Hua; Meng, Hua-Qing; Peng, Dai-Hui; Qiu, Hai-Tang; Qiu, Jiang; Shen, Yue-Di; Shi, Yu-Shu; Wang, Fei; Wang, Kai; Wang, Li; Wang, Xiang; Wang, Ying; Wu, Xiao-Ping; Wu, Xin-Ran; Xie, Chun-Ming; Xie, Guang-Rong; Xie, Hai-Yan; Xie, Peng; Xu, Xiu-Feng; Yang, Hong; Yang, Jian; Yao, Jia-Shu; Yao, Shu-Qiao; Yin, Ying-Ying; Yuan, Yong-Gui; Zhang, Hong; Zhang, Lei; Zhang, Zhi-Jun; Zhou, Ru-Bai; Zhou, Yi-Ting; Zhu, Jun-Juan; Zou, Chao-Jie; Si, Tian-Mei; Zuo, Xi-Nian; Yan, Chao-Gan; Zhang, Ke-Rang
First AuthorLiu, Peng-Hong
Correspondent Emailatomsxmu@vip.163.com (k.-r. zhang)
Abstract

OBJECTIVE: While gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms are very common in patients with major depressive disorder (MDD), few studies have investigated the neural basis behind these symptoms. In this study, we sought to elucidate the neural basis of GI symptoms in MDD patients by analyzing the changes in regional gray matter volume (GMV) and gray matter density (GMD) in brain structure. METHOD: Subjects were recruited from 13 clinical centers and categorized into three groups, each of which is based on the presence or absence of GI symptoms: the GI symptoms group (MDD patients with at least one GI symptom), the non-GI symptoms group (MDD patients without any GI symptoms), and the healthy control group (HCs). Structural magnetic resonance images (MRI) were collected of 335 patients in the GI symptoms group, 149 patients in the non-GI symptoms group, and 446 patients in the healthy control group. The 17-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAMD-17) was administered to all patients. Correlation analysis and logistic regression analysis were used to determine if there was a correlation between the altered brain regions and the clinical symptoms. RESULTS: There were significantly higher HAMD-17 scores in the GI symptoms group than that of the non-GI symptoms group (P<0.001). Both GMV and GMD were significant different among the three groups for the bilateral superior temporal gyrus, bilateral middle temporal gyrus, left lingual gyrus, bilateral caudate nucleus, right Fusiform gyrus and bilateral Thalamus (GRF correction, cluster-P<0.01, voxel-P<0.001). Compared to the HC group, the GI symptoms group demonstrated increased GMV and GMD in the bilateral superior temporal gyrus, and the non-GI symptoms group demonstrated an increased GMV and GMD in the right superior temporal gyrus, right fusiform gyrus and decreased GMV in the right Caudate nucleus (GRF correction, cluster-P<0.01, voxel-P<0.001). Compared to the non-GI symptoms group, the GI symptoms group demonstrated significantly increased GMV and GMD in the bilateral thalamus, as well as decreased GMV in the bilateral superior temporal gyrus and bilateral insula lobe (GRF correction, cluster-P<0.01, voxel-P<0.001). While these changed brain areas had significantly association with GI symptoms (P<0.001), they were not correlated with depressive symptoms (P>0.05). Risk factors for gastrointestinal symptoms in MDD patients (p<0.05) included age, increased GMD in the right thalamus, and decreased GMV in the bilateral superior temporal gyrus and left Insula lobe. CONCLUSION: MDD patients with GI symptoms have more severe depressive symptoms. MDD patients with GI symptoms exhibited larger GMV and GMD in the bilateral thalamus, and smaller GMV in the bilateral superior temporal gyrus and bilateral insula lobe that were correlated with GI symptoms, and some of them and age may contribute to the presence of GI symptoms in MDD patients.

KeywordMajor depressive disorder Gastrointestinal symptoms Gray matter volume Gray matter density
2021
DOI10.1016/j.pnpbp.2021.110386
Source PublicationProgress in Neuro-Psychopharmacology & Biological Psychiatry
ISSN1878-4216
Volume111Pages:110386
Subtype实证研究
Citation statistics
Document Type期刊论文
Identifierhttp://ir.psych.ac.cn/handle/311026/40741
Collection中国科学院行为科学重点实验室
Affiliation1.Department of Psychiatry, First Hospital of Shanxi Medical University, Taiyuan 030001, China
2.Department of First Clinical Medicine, Shanxi Medical University, Taiyuan 030001, China.
3.Department of Clinical Medicine, Fenyang College of Shanxi Medical University, 032200, China.
4.Department of Psychiatry, First Hospital of Shanxi Medical University, Taiyuan 030001, China.
5.CAS Key Laboratory of Behavioral Science, Institute of Psychology, Beijing 100054, China
6.Department of Psychology, University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100054, China.
7.Anhui Medical University, Hefei, Anhui 230022, China.
8.Beijing Anding Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing 100054, China.
9.The First Affiliated Hospital of Jinan University, Guangzhou, Guangdong 510630, China.
10.Mental Health Center, West China Hospital, Sichuan University Chengdu, Sichuan 610041, China.
11.Sir Run Run Shaw Hospital, Zhejiang University School of Medicine, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310012, China.
12.The Institute of Mental Health, Second Xiangya Hospital of Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410008, China.
13.First Affiliated Hospital of Kunming Medical University, Kunming, Yunnan 650221, China.
14.Department of Psychiatry, First Affiliated Hospital, China Medical University, Shenyang, Liaoning 110001, China.
15.Department of Psychiatry, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200240, China.
16.Department of Radiology, Huaxi MR Research Center,West China Hospital of Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan 610041, China
17.Psychoradiology Research Unit of Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, West China Hospital of Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan 610041, China.
18.Department of Psychiatry, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 400016, China.
19.Department of Radiology, Huaxi MR Research Center,West China Hospital of Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan 610041, China.
20.Department of Clinical Psychology, Suzhou Psychiatric Hospital, The Affiliated Guangji Hospital of Soochow University, Suzhou, Jiangsu 215137, China.
21.Faculty of Psychology, Southwest University, Chongqing 400716, China.
22.Department of Diagnostics, Affiliated Hospital, Hangzhou Normal University Medical School, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 311121, China.
23.National Clinical Research Center for Mental Disorders, Peking University Sixth Hospital, Beijing 100191, China
24.Key Laboratory of Mental Health, Ministry of Health, Peking University, Beijing 100191, China.
25.Xi'an Central Hospital, Xi'an, Shannxi 710003, China.
26.Department of Neurology, Affiliated ZhongDa Hospital of Southeast University, Nanjing, Jiangsu 210009, China.
27.Department of Psychiatry, The Fourth Affiliated Hospital, College of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310058, China.
28.Institute of Neuroscience, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 400016, China
29.Chongqing Key Laboratory of Neurobiology, Chongqing, 400016, China
30.Department of Neurology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, 400016, China.
31.Department of Radiology, The First Affiliated Hospital, College of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310058, China.
32.The First Affiliated Hospital of Xi'an Jiaotong University, Shaanxi 710061, China.
33.Department of Psychosomatics and Psychiatry, Zhongda Hospital, School of Medicine, Southeast University, Nanjing, Jiangsu 210096, China.
34.Department of Psychology, University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100054, China
35.Magnetic Resonance Imaging Research Center and Research Center for Lifespan Development of Mind and Brain (CLIMB), Institute of Psychology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100054, China.
36.Magnetic Resonance Imaging Research Center and Research Center for Lifespan Development of Mind and Brain (CLIMB), Institute of Psychology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100054, China
37.Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, NYU Langone Medical Center School of Medicine, New York, NY 10016, USA.
Recommended Citation
GB/T 7714
Liu, Peng-Hong,Li, Yan,Zhang, Ai-Xia,et al. Brain structural alterations in MDD patients with gastrointestinal symptoms: Evidence from the REST-meta-MDD project.[J]. Progress in Neuro-Psychopharmacology & Biological Psychiatry,2021,111:110386.
APA Liu, Peng-Hong.,Li, Yan.,Zhang, Ai-Xia.,Sun, Ning.,Li, Gai-Zhi.,...&Zhang, Ke-Rang.(2021).Brain structural alterations in MDD patients with gastrointestinal symptoms: Evidence from the REST-meta-MDD project..Progress in Neuro-Psychopharmacology & Biological Psychiatry,111,110386.
MLA Liu, Peng-Hong,et al."Brain structural alterations in MDD patients with gastrointestinal symptoms: Evidence from the REST-meta-MDD project.".Progress in Neuro-Psychopharmacology & Biological Psychiatry 111(2021):110386.
Files in This Item:
File Name/Size DocType Version Access License
Brain structural alt(2435KB)期刊论文作者接受稿限制开放CC BY-NC-SAApplication Full Text
Related Services
Recommend this item
Bookmark
Usage statistics
Export to Endnote
Google Scholar
Similar articles in Google Scholar
[Liu, Peng-Hong]'s Articles
[Li, Yan]'s Articles
[Zhang, Ai-Xia]'s Articles
Baidu academic
Similar articles in Baidu academic
[Liu, Peng-Hong]'s Articles
[Li, Yan]'s Articles
[Zhang, Ai-Xia]'s Articles
Bing Scholar
Similar articles in Bing Scholar
[Liu, Peng-Hong]'s Articles
[Li, Yan]'s Articles
[Zhang, Ai-Xia]'s Articles
Terms of Use
No data!
Social Bookmark/Share
All comments (0)
No comment.
 

Items in the repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.