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A cross-cultural study of employers' concerns about hiring people with psychotic disorder: implications for recovery
Tsang, Hector W. H.; Angell, Beth; Corrigan, Patrick W.; Lee, Yueh-Ting; Shi, Kan; Lam, Chow S.; Jin, Shenghua; Fung, Kevin M. T.; H. W. H. Tsang
2007-09-01
Source PublicationSOCIAL PSYCHIATRY AND PSYCHIATRIC EPIDEMIOLOGY
ISSN0933-7954
SubtypeArticle
Volume42Issue:9Pages:723-733
AbstractIntroduction Employment discrimination is considered as a major impediment to community integration for people with serious mental illness, yet little is known about how the problem manifests differently across western and non-western societies. We developed a lay model based on Chinese beliefs and values in terms of Confucianism, Taoism, Buddhism, and folk religions which may be used to explain cross-cultural variation in mental illness stigma, particularly in the arena of employment discrimination. In this study, we tested this lay approach by comparing employers' concerns about hiring people with psychotic disorder for entry-level jobs in US and China. Method One hundred employers ( 40 from Chicago, 30 from Hong Kong, and 30 from Beijing) were randomly recruited from small size firms and interviewed by certified interviewers using a semi-structured interview guide designed for this study. Content analysis was used to derive themes, which in turn were compared across the three sites using chi-square tests. Results Analyses reveal that employers express a range of concerns about hiring an employee with mental illness. Although some concerns were raised with equal frequency across sites, comparisons showed that, relative to US employers, Chinese employers were significantly more likely to perceive that people with mental illness would exhibit a weaker work ethic and less loyalty to the company. Comparison of themes also suggests that employers in China were more people-oriented while employers in US were more task-oriented. Conclusion Cultural differences existed among employers which supported the lay theory of mental illness.; Introduction Employment discrimination is considered as a major impediment to community integration for people with serious mental illness, yet little is known about how the problem manifests differently across western and non-western societies. We developed a lay model based on Chinese beliefs and values in terms of Confucianism, Taoism, Buddhism, and folk religions which may be used to explain cross-cultural variation in mental illness stigma, particularly in the arena of employment discrimination. In this study, we tested this lay approach by comparing employers' concerns about hiring people with psychotic disorder for entry-level jobs in US and China. Method One hundred employers ( 40 from Chicago, 30 from Hong Kong, and 30 from Beijing) were randomly recruited from small size firms and interviewed by certified interviewers using a semi-structured interview guide designed for this study. Content analysis was used to derive themes, which in turn were compared across the three sites using chi-square tests. Results Analyses reveal that employers express a range of concerns about hiring an employee with mental illness. Although some concerns were raised with equal frequency across sites, comparisons showed that, relative to US employers, Chinese employers were significantly more likely to perceive that people with mental illness would exhibit a weaker work ethic and less loyalty to the company. Comparison of themes also suggests that employers in China were more people-oriented while employers in US were more task-oriented. Conclusion Cultural differences existed among employers which supported the lay theory of mental illness.
Keywordpsychotic disorder recovery employment cross-cultural differences lay theory
Subject Area工业与组织心理学
Indexed BySSCI
Language英语
WOS IDWOS:000248983400007
Citation statistics
Document Type期刊论文
Identifierhttp://ir.psych.ac.cn/handle/311026/5121
Collection中国科学院心理研究所回溯数据库(1956-2010)
Corresponding AuthorH. W. H. Tsang
Affiliation1.Hong Kong Polytech Univ, Dept Rehabil Sci, Hong Hom, Hong Kong, Peoples R China
2.Univ Chicago, Sch Social Serv Adm, Chicago, IL 60637 USA
3.IIT, Inst Psychol, Chicago, IL 60616 USA
4.Minot State Univ, Coll Arts & Sci, Minot, ND USA
5.Chinese Acad Sci, Inst Psychol, Beijing, Peoples R China
6.Beijing Normal Univ, Sch Psychol, Beijing 100875, Peoples R China
Recommended Citation
GB/T 7714
Tsang, Hector W. H.,Angell, Beth,Corrigan, Patrick W.,et al. A cross-cultural study of employers' concerns about hiring people with psychotic disorder: implications for recovery[J]. SOCIAL PSYCHIATRY AND PSYCHIATRIC EPIDEMIOLOGY,2007,42(9):723-733.
APA Tsang, Hector W. H..,Angell, Beth.,Corrigan, Patrick W..,Lee, Yueh-Ting.,Shi, Kan.,...&H. W. H. Tsang.(2007).A cross-cultural study of employers' concerns about hiring people with psychotic disorder: implications for recovery.SOCIAL PSYCHIATRY AND PSYCHIATRIC EPIDEMIOLOGY,42(9),723-733.
MLA Tsang, Hector W. H.,et al."A cross-cultural study of employers' concerns about hiring people with psychotic disorder: implications for recovery".SOCIAL PSYCHIATRY AND PSYCHIATRIC EPIDEMIOLOGY 42.9(2007):723-733.
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