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Reversed effects of RU486 and anisomycin on memory retention of light exposure or corticosterone facilitation in the dark-incubated chicks
Sui, N; Hu, JF; Chen, J; Kuang, PZ; Joyce, D
2001-12-01
Source PublicationJOURNAL OF PSYCHOPHARMACOLOGY
ISSN0269-8811
SubtypeArticle
Volume15Issue:4Pages:287-291
AbstractMemory formation for a weak passive avoidance task in the dark-incubated chicks is facilitated by light exposure or corticosterone administration at optimally pre-hatch time points. To explore the potential mechanisms underlying activation of brain memory function development by light or corticosterone exposure during late embryo, steroid receptor antagonist RU486, or protein synthetic inhibitor anisomycin, was administered intraembryonically to the embryos of either only 24-h light-exposure or complete dark-hatched on embryonic day 20 (E20). The results showed that RU486 and anisomycin significantly retarded the facilitated retention both by light and corticosterone exposure in the dark-incubated chicks. They also suggest that the act of corticosterone or light exposure on the development of brain memory function is mediated by the effect of steroid receptor, or afterward on related protein syntheses that is involved in memory formation of post-hatched performance of day-old chicks.; Memory formation for a weak passive avoidance task in the dark-incubated chicks is facilitated by light exposure or corticosterone administration at optimally pre-hatch time points. To explore the potential mechanisms underlying activation of brain memory function development by light or corticosterone exposure during late embryo, steroid receptor antagonist RU486, or protein synthetic inhibitor anisomycin, was administered intraembryonically to the embryos of either only 24-h light-exposure or complete dark-hatched on embryonic day 20 (E20). The results showed that RU486 and anisomycin significantly retarded the facilitated retention both by light and corticosterone exposure in the dark-incubated chicks. They also suggest that the act of corticosterone or light exposure on the development of brain memory function is mediated by the effect of steroid receptor, or afterward on related protein syntheses that is involved in memory formation of post-hatched performance of day-old chicks.
Keywordanisomycin brain corticosterone day-old chicks development memory RU486
Subject Area生理心理学/生物心理学
Indexed BySCI
Language英语
WOS IDWOS:000172723900011
Citation statistics
Document Type期刊论文
Identifierhttp://ir.psych.ac.cn/handle/311026/5665
Collection中国科学院心理研究所回溯数据库(1956-2010)
Affiliation1.Acad Sinica, Inst Psychol, Brain & Behav Res Ctr, Beijing, Peoples R China
2.Univ Michigan, Dept Chem, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 USA
Recommended Citation
GB/T 7714
Sui, N,Hu, JF,Chen, J,et al. Reversed effects of RU486 and anisomycin on memory retention of light exposure or corticosterone facilitation in the dark-incubated chicks[J]. JOURNAL OF PSYCHOPHARMACOLOGY,2001,15(4):287-291.
APA Sui, N,Hu, JF,Chen, J,Kuang, PZ,&Joyce, D.(2001).Reversed effects of RU486 and anisomycin on memory retention of light exposure or corticosterone facilitation in the dark-incubated chicks.JOURNAL OF PSYCHOPHARMACOLOGY,15(4),287-291.
MLA Sui, N,et al."Reversed effects of RU486 and anisomycin on memory retention of light exposure or corticosterone facilitation in the dark-incubated chicks".JOURNAL OF PSYCHOPHARMACOLOGY 15.4(2001):287-291.
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