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The depressive-like behaviors are correlated with decreased phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinases in rat brain following chronic forced swim stress
Qi, Xiaoli; Lin, Wenjuan; Li, Junfa; Pan, Yuqin; Wang, Weiwen; W. J. Lin
2006-12-15
Source PublicationBEHAVIOURAL BRAIN RESEARCH
ISSN0166-4328
SubtypeArticle
Volume175Issue:2Pages:233-240
AbstractIn the present study, 40 Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into forced swim stress group and controls, with 20 rats in each group (10 for behavioral tests. 10 for protein detection). The forced swim stress group received swim stress for 14 consecutive days, and the controls were stress-free. After stress, 20 rats were tested for behavioral observation using body weight gain, open field, elevated plus-maze and saccharine preference test, and 20 rats were decapitated for protein detection. The extracellular signal-regulated kinase (Erk) and phospho-Erk (P-Erk) in the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex were determined using western blot. It was found that the body weight gain of stressed animals during the 7 stressed days and the 14 stressed days was significantly decreased compared to that of controls. Stressed animals spent less time in open arms and longer time in closed arms. The stressed animals demonstrated decreased locomotor activity and increased grooming in open field. The saccharine solution intake and the ratio of saccharine solution intake to total liquid intake were both decreased in the stressed group. Stressed animals showed decreased P-Erk2 and decreased ratio of P-Erk2 to total Erk2 in the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex, but their Erk1/2 was increased in the prefrontal cortex with no change in hippocampus. The saccharine solution intake positively correlated with the P-Erk2 in the hippocampus and negatively correlated with the Erk2 in the prefrontal cortex. In conclusion, chronic forced swim stress was a good animal model of depression, and it induced depressive-like behavior and decreased P-Erk2 in the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex in rats. The depressive-like behaviors were correlated with decreased phosphorylation of Erk, which suggested that the dysfunction of Erk activity might be one of biological mechanisms underlying depression induced by stress.; In the present study, 40 Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into forced swim stress group and controls, with 20 rats in each group (10 for behavioral tests. 10 for protein detection). The forced swim stress group received swim stress for 14 consecutive days, and the controls were stress-free. After stress, 20 rats were tested for behavioral observation using body weight gain, open field, elevated plus-maze and saccharine preference test, and 20 rats were decapitated for protein detection. The extracellular signal-regulated kinase (Erk) and phospho-Erk (P-Erk) in the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex were determined using western blot. It was found that the body weight gain of stressed animals during the 7 stressed days and the 14 stressed days was significantly decreased compared to that of controls. Stressed animals spent less time in open arms and longer time in closed arms. The stressed animals demonstrated decreased locomotor activity and increased grooming in open field. The saccharine solution intake and the ratio of saccharine solution intake to total liquid intake were both decreased in the stressed group. Stressed animals showed decreased P-Erk2 and decreased ratio of P-Erk2 to total Erk2 in the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex, but their Erk1/2 was increased in the prefrontal cortex with no change in hippocampus. The saccharine solution intake positively correlated with the P-Erk2 in the hippocampus and negatively correlated with the Erk2 in the prefrontal cortex. In conclusion, chronic forced swim stress was a good animal model of depression, and it induced depressive-like behavior and decreased P-Erk2 in the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex in rats. The depressive-like behaviors were correlated with decreased phosphorylation of Erk, which suggested that the dysfunction of Erk activity might be one of biological mechanisms underlying depression induced by stress. (c) 2006 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
Keywordstress open field anhedonia MAPKs hippocampus prefrontal cortex
Subject Area生理心理学/生物心理学
Indexed BySCI ; SSCI
Language英语
WOS IDWOS:000242680000004
Citation statistics
Cited Times:102[WOS]   [WOS Record]     [Related Records in WOS]
Document Type期刊论文
Identifierhttp://ir.psych.ac.cn/handle/311026/5743
Collection中国科学院心理研究所回溯数据库(1956-2010)
Corresponding AuthorW. J. Lin
Affiliation1.Chinese Acad Sci, Inst Psychol, Brain Behav Res Ctr, Beijing 100101, Peoples R China
2.Capital Univ Med Sci, Beijing 100069, Peoples R China
Recommended Citation
GB/T 7714
Qi, Xiaoli,Lin, Wenjuan,Li, Junfa,et al. The depressive-like behaviors are correlated with decreased phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinases in rat brain following chronic forced swim stress[J]. BEHAVIOURAL BRAIN RESEARCH,2006,175(2):233-240.
APA Qi, Xiaoli,Lin, Wenjuan,Li, Junfa,Pan, Yuqin,Wang, Weiwen,&W. J. Lin.(2006).The depressive-like behaviors are correlated with decreased phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinases in rat brain following chronic forced swim stress.BEHAVIOURAL BRAIN RESEARCH,175(2),233-240.
MLA Qi, Xiaoli,et al."The depressive-like behaviors are correlated with decreased phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinases in rat brain following chronic forced swim stress".BEHAVIOURAL BRAIN RESEARCH 175.2(2006):233-240.
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